f-sharp / g-flat : Major Scale - Introduction

The picture shows three octaves, but I am regarding the scale as consisting of seven distinct notes.

What is below shows the correspondence between the keys we strike and dots we see on scores.
(However, the physicist's love of symmetry has made me move one of the sharp symbols.)

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 1st

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 2nd

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 3rd

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 4th

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 5th

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 6th

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f-sharp : Major Scale - 7th

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g-flat : Major Scale - 1st

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g-flat : Major Scale - 2nd

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g-flat : Major Scale - 3rd

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g-flat : Major Scale - 4th

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g-flat : Major Scale - 5th

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g-flat : Major Scale - 6th

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g-flat : Major Scale - 7th

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f-sharp / g-flat : Major Scale - Conclusion

I find this particular major scale to be fascinating because, looking at the scores, we must play   F   as   E-sharp   or   B   as   C-flat.